MARC LANCET
Reviews of Japanese Wood-fired Ceramics
From Clay Times November 1, 2006
By Steven Branfman

Japanese Wood-fired Ceramics is quite a book. Three hundred and
twenty thick, glossy pages with outstanding color photos and
drawings on virtually every one. The sesign of the book = its
format, the typefaceused, the placement of photos, the
arrangement of text and other features = is one of the most
friendly and inviting I have ever seen. It demands - no, asks nicely -
to be opened, examined, and read thoroughly. The authors, who
have been friends and collaborators for almost 15 years, have
obviously taken great pains The writing style is conversational,
fluid, easy to read and to understand, inclusive and encouraging.
In fact, I found it so building a wood kiln or wood firing, reading
the book was educating, interesting and down right enjoyable.
Marc and Masakazu (I feel as if The writing style is conversational,
fluid, easy to read and to we are friends) are excellent teachers
who have clear skill in, and understand, inclusive and
encouraging. In fact, I found it so passion for, teaching. Tips,
advice, and coaching appear throughout. comfortable and
captivating that even though I have no interest in comfortable and
captivating that even though I have no interest in building a wood
kiln or wood firing, reading the book was educating, interesting
and down right enjoyable. Marc and Masakazu (I feel as if we are
friends) are excellent teachers who have clear skill in, and passion
for, teaching. Tips, advice, and coaching appear throughout.
Rarely, if ever, is the reader left wondering or asking, "What do
they mean by that?"  The section on loading, for instance, starts
with the very basics of shelf layout and goes right to the materials
necessary for loading. Loading strategy, post placement,
arranging your ware, and all the necessary considerations are
covered. Fifty-two diagrams illustrate various loading strategies
and potential flame patterns. Now
that is detail!
Japanese Wood-fired Ceramics is a welcome addition to the
available books on the subject. It gracefully and tastefully adds its
own approach and style to the mix, and helps bring the experience
of wood-firing to the pottery community.
Marc and Masakazu, your labor of love is complete and you did a
fine job.
From Ceramics Art and Perspective, Vol 64, 2006
By Jack Troy

Japanese Wood-fired Ceramics is a major contribution to the field.
With its many computerized illustrations of kiln designs, dozens of
'pyro-dermatology', and firing procedures, Kusakabe and Lancet
subject. It is hard to imagine many readers who couldn't learn
something new from it.
A quick browse reveals an extraordinary attention to visual details:
exquisitely-detailed computer-generated schematics of kilns
depict variations in firebox designs, stoking patterns and the
correlation of surface effects relative to location of objects in firing
zones. In this regard, the book sets a precedent for its visual
acuity. No other books on the subject have broken ground the way
this one does in explaining the visual/tactile experience uniquely
documented by wood-fired work while relating specific effects to
processes accounting for them.
Japanese Wood-fired Ceramics was written by people whose
passionate commitment to practice rises from a desire to share
their learning, Their efforts deserve our readership.
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